Key Facts About H1N1 Vaccine

September 25, 20100 comments






There are two types of vaccines available:
· The "flu shot" — an inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The flu shot is approved for use in people older than 6 months, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions.

  • Available as monovalent, inactivated influenza A virus vaccine (H1N1) for IM injection. Indicated for active immunization against influenza caused by pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. Stimulates active immunity to influenza virus infection by inducing production of specific antibodies.
  • Adult IM injection: 0.5 mL IM in deltoid muscle of upper arm (1 dose)
  • Pediatric IM injection (Sanofi Pasteur and CSL Limited vaccines)
  • 6-35 months: 0.25 mL IM; administer 2 injections approximately 4 wk apart
  • 3-9 years: 0.5 mL IM; administer 2 injections approximately 4 wk apart
  • 10-17 years: Administer as in adults

  • IM injection (Novartis vaccine)
  • 4-9 years: 0.5 mL IM; administer 2 injections approximately 4 wk apart
  • 10-17 years: Administer as in adults
  • Administer IM injection in anterolateral aspect of thigh for infants, and administer in deltoid muscle of upper arm in toddlers and children
  • Avoid gluteal region or areas with major nerve trunk
· The nasal-spray flu vaccine a vaccine made with live, weakened flu viruses that do not cause the flu (sometimes called LAIV for "live attenuated influenza vaccine" or FluMist®). LAIV (FluMist®) is approved for use in healthy* people 2-49 years of age who are not pregnant.

    Available as monovalent live virus vaccine for intranasal administration. Indicated for active immunization against influenza caused by pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.

    Stimulates active immunity to influenza virus infection by inducing production of specific antibodies.

  Adult
Intranasal (10-49 years): 0.2 mL/dose (0.1 mL per nostril) intranasally (1 dose)

  Pediatric
Intranasal (MedImmune vaccine)
2-9 years: 0.2 mL/dose (0.1 mL per nostril) intranasally; administer 2 doses approximately 4 wk apart
>9 years: Administer as in adults


Who Should Get Vaccinated


While it is advisable for everyone to get a vaccine, it’s especially important that the following groups get vaccinated either because they are at high risk of having serious flu-related complications or because they live with or care for people at high risk for developing flu-related complications:

1. Pregnant women

2. Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old

3. People 50 years of age and older

4. People of any age with certain chronic medical conditions

5. People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities

6. People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including:

a. Health care workers

b. Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu

c. Household contacts and out of home caregivers of children less than 6 months of age (these children are too young to be vaccinated)

Who Should Not Be Vaccinated
There are some people who should not get a flu vaccine without first consulting a physician. These include:

1. People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs.

2. People who have had a severe reaction to an influenza vaccination.

3. People who developed Guillain-BarrĂ© syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of getting an influenza vaccine.

4. Children less than 6 months of age (vaccine is not approved for this age group), and

5. People who have a moderate-to-severe illness with a fever (they should wait until they recover to get vaccinated.)

Vaccine Side Effects (What to Expect)


Different side effects can be associated with the flu shot and LAIV.

The flu shot (Injection): The viruses in the flu shot are killed (inactivated), so you cannot get the flu from a flu shot. Some minor side effects that could occur are:

· Soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given

· Fever (low grade)

· Aches

If these problems occur, they begin soon after the shot and usually last 1 to 2 days.

The nasal spray (also called LAIV or FluMist®): The viruses in the nasal-spray vaccine are weakened and do not cause severe symptoms often associated with influenza illness. (In clinical studies, transmission of vaccine viruses to close contacts has occurred only rarely.)
In children, side effects from LAIV (FluMist®) can include:

· runny nose

· wheezing

· headache

· vomiting

· muscle aches

· fever

In adults, side effects from LAIV (FluMist®) can include

· runny nose

· headache

· sore throat

· cough

Click here here to read more on the flu vaccines.

Disclaimer: The information provided are based on the guidelines from CDC and publications from other national health authorities. Please consult your physician and get professional advice before getting the vaccine shots.


Related Posts:


  1. H1N1 Vaccination – Who should be vaccinated?
  2. Swine flu – a porky problem
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