Questions in Medical Virology - Ask the Expert

March 16, 20113comments

Ask your questions in Medical Virology in the comments section and get clarified from your query by our experts in the specified discipline.

Interesting questions along with answers will be published in comments section as early as possible.

The viewers are requested to restrict the question to Medical Virology, since questions regarding General Microbiology, Immunology, Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology are posted as separate.

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Anonymous
May 8, 2011 at 7:39 AM

Hello, I'm trying to learn more about how HSV can cause neuropathy. I'm experiencing nerve pain, coldness, muscle twitching, and other symptoms that has been consistent for several years without outbreaks. I'm trying to understand this condition and how I can battle it and hopefully heal myself. I'm so confused at how a virus that is common with so many people can be causing me so much pain. If you have any information I would greatly appreciate it. If you don't have any answers please refer me to someone who might know. You can use this email in your blog but please keep me anonymous. Thank you so much for your time.

Sekar
May 12, 2011 at 8:11 PM

Answer to the question asked in Comment No. 1:

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is one of the unique one, which has the
ability to cause life-long latent infection in neuronal ganglion (oral herpes - HSV 1 in trigeminal ganglion & genital herpes - HSV 2 in sacral ganglion). Reactivation of the virus and followed by clinical symptoms occur periodically with different stimulus. In general, latent virus is reactivated after local stimuli such as injury to tissues innervated by neurons harboring latent virus, or by systemic stimuli (e.g., physical or emotional stress, hyperthermia,
exposure to UV light, menstruation, hormonal imbalance). Hence,
reactivations can be prevented by preventing the above mentioned
potential risk factors. Acute manifestations can be temporarily
managed with antiviral chemotherapy (have its own side effects) with
the consultation of recognized registered medical practitioner.

Kindly seek clinical examination medical advice and consultation for your actual problem.

For more information,
Bloom DC. HSV LAT and neuronal survival. Int Rev Immunol 2004;23:187
Decman V, Freeman ML, Kinchington PR, et al. Immune control of HSV-1
latency. Viral Immunol 2005;18:466


Disclaimer:

The informations provided in this website are, for educational and informational purposes only. In no way should it be considered as offering medical advice. Please consult with a physician for medical advice.

Sekar
May 18, 2011 at 12:16 PM

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is one of the unique one, which has the capability to cause life-long latent infection in neuronal ganglion (oral herpes - HSV 1 in trigeminal ganglion & genital herpes - HSV 2 in sacral ganglion). Reactivation of the virus and followed by clinical symptoms occur periodically with different stimulus. In general, latent virus is reactivated after local stimuli such as injury to tissues innervated by neurons harboring latent virus, or by systemic stimuli (e.g., physical or emotional stress, hyperthermia, exposure to UV light, menstruation, hormonal imbalance). Hence, reactivations can be prevented by preventing the above mentioned potential risk factors. Acute manifestations can me temporarily managed with antiviral chemotherapy (have its own side effects) with
the consultation of recognized registered medical practitioner.

For more information,
Bloom DC. HSV LAT and neuronal survival. Int Rev Immunol 2004;23:187

Decman V, Freeman ML, Kinchington PR, et al. Immune control of HSV-1 slatency. Viral Immunol 2005;18:466

Disclaimer: The information provided here is for educational and informational purposes only. In no way should it be considered as offering medical advice. Please consult with a physician for medical advice.

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